Researchers Database

SAKAGUCHI Shuichi

    Faculty Division of Natural Sciences Research Group of Biological Sciences Associate Professor
Contact:
guchicc.nara-wu.ac.jp
Last Updated :2021/06/02

researchmap

Degree

  • Ph.D., The University of Tokyo
  • Master of Science, The University of Tokyo

Research Interests

  • Higher plants, Plant Development, Morphogenesis, Shoot apical meristem, Phyllotaxis, Microtubule, Signal transduction, Clonal analysis, Recombinant DNA, Transgenic plant, Tissue culture, Plant movement, Electron microscopy, micro X-ray CT 

Research Areas

  • Life sciences, Morphology, anatomy

Research Experience

  • Apr. 2012, 奈良女子大学研究院自然科学系生物科学領域准教授
  • Apr. 2003 Mar. - 2012, Associate Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Nara Women's University
  • Apr. 1999 Mar. - 2003, Associate Professor, Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Nara Women's University
  • Apr. 1994 Mar. - 1999, Associate Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Nara Women's University
  • Sep. 1990 Mar. - 1994, Assistant Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Nara Women's University
  • Nov. 1988 Aug. - 1990, Postdoctoral fellow, National Institute for Basic Biology

Education

  • - 1988, The University of Tokyo, Graduate School, Division of Science, Botany
  • - 1982, The University of Tokyo, Faculty of Science, Department of Biology (Botany)

Committee Memberships

  • Jan. 2013 Dec.2016The Botanical Society of Japaneditor: Journal of Plant Research
  • Jan. 2010 Dec.2013The Japanese Society of Plant Morphology評議員
  • Jan. 2011 Dec.2012The Botanical Society of JapanEditorial board member (Journal of Plant Research)
  • Jan. 2010 Dec.2011The Japanese Society of Plant Morphology広報委員(庶務幹事兼任)
  • Jan. 2008 Dec.2011The Japanese Society of Plant Morphology庶務幹事
  • Apr. 2011 Sep.2011The Japanese Society of Plant Morphology第23回大会準備委員長
  • Apr. 2010 Sep.2010The Japanese Society of Plant Morphology第22回大会準備委員長
  • Apr. 2009 Sep.2009The Japanese Society of Plant Morphology第21回大会準備委員長
  • Apr. 2008 Sep.2008The Japanese Society of Plant Morphology第20回大会準備委員長
  • Jan. 2006 Dec.2007The Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists選挙管理委員
  • Apr. 1998 Mar.2004The Japanese Society of Plant Morphology編集委員
  • Jan. 2000 Dec.2001The Japanese Society of Plant Morphology評議員

Published Papers

  • Ion gradients in xylem exudate and guttation fluid related to tissue ion levels along primary leaves of barley

    Makiko Nagai; Miwa Ohnishi; Takeo Uehara; Mutsumi Yamagami; Eiko Miura; Mai Kamakura; Akira Kitamura; Shu-Ichi Sakaguchi; Wataru Sakamoto; Teruo Shimmen; Hidehiro Fukaki; Robert J. Reid; Akio Furukawa; Tetsuro Mimura

    The concentration of ions in plant cells and tissues is an essential factor in determining physiological function. In the present study, we established that concentration gradients of mobile ions exist in both xylem exudates and tissues within a barley (Hordeum vulgare) primary leaf. For K+ and NO3-, ion concentrations generally decreased from the leaf base to the tip in both xylem exudates and tissues. Ion gradients were also found for Pi and Cl- in the xylem. The hydathode strongly absorbed Pi and re-translocated it to the rest of the plant, whereas Cl- was extruded. The ion concentration gradients developed early during leaf growth, increased as the tissue aged and remained under both high and low transpiration conditions. Measurement of the expression profiles of Pi, K+ and NO3- transporters along the longitudinal axis of the leaf revealed that some transporters are more expressed at the hydathode, but for most transporters, there was no significant variation along the leaf. The mechanisms by which longitudinal ion gradients develop in leaves and their physiological functions are discussed. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd., Oct. 2013, Plant, Cell and Environment, 36 (10), 1826 - 1837, doi;pubmed

    Scientific journal

  • Unique profiles of changes in cell membrane fluidity during ethanol-induced yeast to pseudohyphal transition in Candida tropicalis.

    SAKAGUCHI Shuichi; Suzuki, T; Kono, K; Tawara, S; Fujimura, T; Ito, T; Omi, K; Ohbuchi, K; Komatsu, Y; Sakaguchi, S; Kamihara, T

    石油資化酵母Candida tropicalisのエタノール添加培養では、膜の流動性が上昇して脱極性化した細胞となり、その後に膜の流動性が戻る過程で菌糸形成が起こることを、DPHを蛍光プローブとした蛍光偏光法によって解析し、あわせて膜のリン脂質成分変化量との対応関係を調べた。, 2010, Journal of General and Applied Microbiology, 56, 321-329

  • Somaclonal variation and the ploidy Level in Phalaenopsis alliance.

    SAKAGUCHI Shuichi; Tian-Su Zhou

    2003, Plant Morphology, 15 (1), 2-7

  • Development and disintegration of phragmoplasts in living cultured cells of a GFP :: TUA6 transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plant

    K Ueda; S Sakaguchi; F Kumagai; S Hasezawa; H Quader; U Kristen

    Cultured suspension cells of Arabidopsis thaliana that stably express a green-fluorescent protein-alpha-tubulin 6 fusion protein were used to follow the development and disintegration of phragmoplasts. The development and disintegration of phragmoplasts in the living cultured cells could be successively observed by detecting the green-fluorescent protein fluorescence of the microtubules. In the early telophase spindle, where two kinetochore groups and two daughter chromosome groups had completely separated from one another, fluorescence appeared in the interzone between the two chromosome groups. The fluorescent region was gradually condensed at the previous equator and increased in fluorescence intensity, and finally it formed the initial phragmoplast. The initial phragmoplast moved from the cell center towards the cell periphery, and it lost fluorescence at its center and became double rings in shape. The expansion orientation of the phragmoplast was not always the same as that of the future new cell wall before it came in contact with the cell wall. The phragmoplast did not usually come in contact with the cell wall simultaneously with its entire length. A portion of the phragmoplast which was earlier in contact with the cell wall disappeared earlier than other portions of the phragmoplast. The duration of contact between any portions of the phragmoplast and the plasma membrane of the cell wall was 15-30 min. The fluorescence intensity of the cytoplasm did not seem to be elevated by the disintegration of the strongly fluorescent phragmoplast., SPRINGER WIEN, 2003, PROTOPLASMA, 220 (3-4), 111 - 118, doi;web_of_science

    Scientific journal

  • Origin and development of juice sacs in the fruits of Citrus natsudaidai Hayata

    SAKAGUCHI Shuichi; Mitsuko Sugiyama

    2002, Plant Morphology, 14 (1), 29-33

  • Ca2+ signal is generated only once in the mating pheromone response pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    J Nakajima-Shimada; S Sakaguchi; F Tsuji; Y Anraku; H Iida

    The mating pheromone, alpha-factor, of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae binds to the heterotrimeric G protein-coupled cell surface receptor of MATa cells and induces cellular responses necessary for mating. In higher eukaryotic cells, many hormones and growth factors rapidly mobilize a second messenger, Ca2+, by means of receptor-C protein signaling. Although striking similarities between the mechanisms of the receptor-G protein signaling in yeast and higher eukaryotes have long been known, it is still uncertain whether the pheromone rapidly mobilizes Ca2+ necessary for early events of the pheromone response. Here we reexamine this problem using. sensitive methods for detecting Ca2+ fluxes and mobilization, and find no evidence that there is rapid Ca2+ influx leading to a rapid increase in the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration. In addition, the yeast PLC1 deletion mutant lacking phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C, a hey enzyme for generating Ca2+ signals in higher eukaryotic cells, responds normally to the pheromone. These findings suggest that the receptor-G protein signaling does not utilize Ca2+ as a second messenger In the early stage of the pheromone response pathway, Since the receptor-G protein signaling does stimulate Ca2+ influx after early events have finished and this stimulation is essential for late events in the pheromone response pathway {Iida et al,, (1990) J, Biol, Chem., 265: 13391-13399} Ca2+ may be used only once in the signal transduction pathway in unicellular eukaryotes such as yeast., JAPAN SOC CELL BIOLOGY, Apr. 2000, CELL STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION, 25 (2), 125 - 131, web_of_science

    Scientific journal

  • Roles of Ca2+ in hyphal and yeast-form growth in ┣DBCandida(/)-┫DB ┣DBalbicans(/)-┫DB. Growth regulation by altered extracellular and intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations.

    SAKAGUCHI Shuichi; Kyoko Shibuya; uthors

    1997, Mycoscience, 38, 215-225

  • Overproduction of Cdc24p (Cls4p), a guanine nucleotide-exchange factor toward Cdc42 GTPase, impairs initiation of budding in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    S Sakaguchi; S Miyamoto; H Iida; T Suzuki; Y Ohya; Y Anraku

    An entire coding region of the CDC24/CLS4 gene and its truncated derivatives were overexpressed in yeast cells under the control of the GAL1 promoter. Western blotting analysis of the yeast cell lysates showed that the CDC24/CLS4 protein (Cdc24p) was induced to reach its maximum level after 9 h incubation of the cells in galactose medium. Overexpression of Cdc24p within the cells caused the morphological change, accumulating large spherical unbudded cells which exhibited actin cytoskeleton disturbed, chitin delocalized on the cell surface, and cell viability decreased. Multiple nuclei were observed in these cells, indicating that only budding cycle bur not nuclear division cycle is blocked by the overproduction of Cdc24p. In order to identify the region of Cdc24p responsible for the growth inhibition, several truncated CDC24 genes were expressed. Surprisingly, overexpression of fragments either containing the C-terminal 76 amino acid residues or deleting the same region inhibited cellular growth. This suggests that Cdc24p contains multiple functional domains for its tasks, likely cooperating signals of bud positioning and bud timing., SPRINGER-VERLAG WIEN, 1995, PROTOPLASMA, 189 (3-4), 142 - 148, web_of_science

    Scientific journal

  • Overproduction of Cdc24p(cls4p), a GTP-GDP exchange factor toward Cdc42 GTPase impairs initiation of budding in ┣DBSaccharomyces cerevisiae(/)-┫DB.

    SAKAGUCHI Shuichi; Yoshikazu Ohya; uthors

    1995, Protoplasma, 189 (3-4), 142-148

  • OCCURRENCE OF CHROMOSOME REARRANGEMENTS DURING THE FUSION PROCESS IN THE IMPERFECT YEAST CANDIDA-ALBICANS

    T SUZUKI; M YAMADA; S SAKAGUCHI

    Auxotrophic derivatives of three strains of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans of different origins, including 1006 derived from CBS5736, A5153 derived from FC18 and NARA2 derived from NUM961, were used in spheroplast fusion experiments. The DNA content of the prototrophic fusion product obtained following fusion between strains 1006 and A5153 approximated to the sum of those of the parents, but was variable when NARA2 was used as the parent for fusion. Chromosome-sized DNA molecules of the fusion derivatives were separated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to examine whether either or both of the chromosome-sized DNA molecules of each parent were transferred into the fusion derivatives. In the fusion derivatives obtained following fusion between strains 1006 and A5153, nearly the full complement of chromosomes was shown to be transferred, but partial transfer of chromosomes occurred in the fusion derivatives that were obtained following fusion between strains NARA2 and A5153. Results indicated that chromosome loss also occurred when these two strains were fused. Variations in the size of R chromosomes, the rDNA-containing chromosomes, were observed in all fusion derivatives tested, indicating high-frequency recombination between R chromosomes during the fusion process., SOC GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY, Dec. 1994, MICROBIOLOGY-UK, 140, 3319 - 3328, web_of_science

    Scientific journal

  • CORRELATION BETWEEN POLYPLOIDY AND AUXOTROPHIC SEGREGATION IN THE IMPERFECT YEAST CANDIDA-ALBICANS

    T SUZUKI; A HITOMI; PT MAGEE; S SAKAGUCHI

    In order to clarify the relationship between polyploidization and the capability of phenotypic switching in the imperfect yeast Candida albicans, two types of variants were isolated as segregants from a fusant, which produced a proportion of the cell population with a higher ploidy than the rest, either in a temperature-dependent or -independent manner, when incubated at low (28 degrees C) and high (37 degrees C) temperatures. In the case of the temperature-dependent type of variants, high-ploidy cells appeared at 37 degrees C but rarely at 28 degrees C. This phenotype was named Pld(ts) (temperature-sensitive polyploidization), and the temperature-independent phenotype was called Pld(-). The appearance of high-ploidy cells in the culture of the Pld(ts) strain at 37 degrees C was accompanied by a significant increase in the frequency of auxotrophic variants; these variants probably occur as a result of segregation of auxotrophic markers from the heterozygous to the homozygous state. Both Pld(ts) and Pld(-) phenotypes were recessive in a fusion with a Pld(+) parent. An adenine auxotrophic marker (ade1) was introduced into a Pld(ts) strain in a heterozygous state, and the individual high-ploidy cells of this strain, grown at 37 degrees C, were micromanipulated to form colonies, which consisted of red and white sectors appearing at high frequency on a pink background. When the ade1 auxotrophy was introduced into Pld(-) strains, frequently sectored colonies were produced. These results suggested an increased level of chromosome missegregation in both types of Pld mutants. Analyses by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of Ade(-) segregants, derived from a micromanipulated high-ploidy cell of a Pld(ts) strain, suggested the occurrence of nonreciprocal recombination, some of which includes chromosome loss., AMER SOC MICROBIOLOGY, Jun. 1994, JOURNAL OF BACTERIOLOGY, 176 (11), 3345 - 3353, web_of_science

    Scientific journal

  • A ┣DBDBL(/)-┫DB-homologous region of the yeast ┣DBCLS4(/)-┫DB/┣DBCDC24(/)-┫DB gene product is important for Ca2+-modulated bud assembly.

    SAKAGUCHI Shuichi; Shigemi Miyamoto; uthors

    1991, Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 181, 604-610

  • CELL-CYCLE CONTROL BY CA-2+ IN SACCHAROMYCES-CEREVISIAE

    H IIDA; S SAKAGUCHI; Y YAGAWA; Y ANRAKU

    AMER SOC BIOCHEMISTRY MOLECULAR BIOLOGY INC, Dec. 1990, JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY, 265 (34), 21216 - 21222, web_of_science

    Scientific journal

  • SPECIFIC ARRANGEMENTS OF CORTICAL MICROTUBULES ARE CORRELATED WITH THE ARCHITECTURE OF MERISTEMS IN SHOOT APICES OF ANGIOSPERMS AND GYMNOSPERMS

    S SAKAGUCHI; T HOGETSU; N HARA

    BOTANICAL SOC JAPAN, Jun. 1990, BOTANICAL MAGAZINE-TOKYO, 103 (1070), 143 - 163, web_of_science

    Scientific journal

  • ARRANGEMENT OF CORTICAL MICROTUBULES AT THE SURFACE OF THE SHOOT APEX IN VINCA-MAJOR L - OBSERVATIONS BY IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE MICROSCOPY

    S SAKAGUCHI; T HOGETSU; N HARA

    BOTANICAL SOC JAPAN, Dec. 1988, BOTANICAL MAGAZINE-TOKYO, 101 (1064), 497 - 507, web_of_science

    Scientific journal

  • ARRANGEMENT OF CORTICAL MICROTUBULES IN THE SHOOT APEX OF VINCA-MAJOR L - OBSERVATIONS BY IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE MICROSCOPY

    S SAKAGUCHI; T HOGETSU; N HARA

    SPRINGER VERLAG, Sep. 1988, PLANTA, 175 (3), 403 - 411, web_of_science

    Scientific journal

  • INTRA-LEAF AND INTRACELLULAR GRADIENTS IN CHLOROPLAST ULTRASTRUCTURE OF DORSIVENTRAL LEAVES ILLUMINATED FROM THE ADAXIAL OR ABAXIAL SIDE DURING THEIR DEVELOPMENT

    TERASHIMA, I; S SAKAGUCHI; N HARA

    JAPANESE SOC PLANT PHYSIOLOGISTS, Sep. 1986, PLANT AND CELL PHYSIOLOGY, 27 (6), 1023 - 1031, web_of_science

    Scientific journal

MISC

  • 高等学校理科「生物基礎」における生態学教育 ?猿沢池のアオコを題材とした実践的授業展開とその高大連携的検討 ?

    SAKAGUCHI Shuichi

    Oct. 2017, 教育システム研究(奈良女子大学教育システム研究開発センター)別冊「本学の教員養成課程の改善・高度化に向けた大学教員と附属教員の連携研究推進事業」成果論文集, 別冊, 147-151

  • Methods for observation of surface of plant organs

    SAKAGUCHI Shuichi

    海外で開発された最新技術を紹介するとともに日本でおこなうための改変点について記載した。, 1995, Plant Morphology, 7 (1), 59-64

Books etc

  • 植物学の百科事典

    SAKAGUCHI Shuichi (, Range: 分担)

    丸善出版, Jun. 2016, 536-539, 542-543

  • Atlas of Plant Cell Structure

    SAKAGUCHI Shuichi; Tetsuko Noguchi (, Range: 分担)

    Springer, Sep. 2014, 134-135 (ISBN: 9784431549406)

  • 岩波生物学辞典、第五版

    SAKAGUCHI Shuichi (, Range: 分担)

    岩波書店, Feb. 2013, 63--1476中の56ヵ所

  • 生物学辞典

    SAKAGUCHI Shuichi (, Range: 分担)

    東京化学同人, Dec. 2010, p. 337他、71カ所

  • これでナットク!植物の謎 植木屋さんも知らないたくましいその生き方\n(ブルーバックスB-1565)

    SAKAGUCHI Shuichi (, Range: その他)

    講談社, Aug. 2007, 71-73, 73-78, 103-106

  • Food: Up to Date - Food and Health, Food and Safety, Food and Environment -

    SAKAGUCHI Shuichi; Satoru Matsuda; authors (, Range: 分担)

    KIMPODO, Kyoto, Jan. 2005, pp. 194-211

Presentations

  • Toward the analysis of twisting growth using various inhibitors in Phalaenopsis flower stalk

    SAKAGUCHI Shuichi; Yuki Fukuda; Shuichi Sakaguchi

    The 76th annual meeting of the Botanical Society of Japan, Himeji 2012, Sep. 2012, The Botanical Society of Japan

  • コチョウラン花柄のねじれ運動と微小管との関係について

    SAKAGUCHI Shuichi

    日本植物形態学会, Sep. 2011, 東京(日本女子大学)

  • タバコ葉にみられる潜在的異形葉性の観察

    SAKAGUCHI Shuichi

    日本植物形態学会, Sep. 2011, 東京(日本女子大学)

Teaching Experience

  • Experiments in Biology (C) (Nara Women's University)

  • Experiments in Biology (B) (Nara Women's University)

  • Experiments in Biology (A) (Nara Women's University)

  • Practical Exercises on Biological and Environmental Sciences I (Nara Women's University)

  • Special Course in Molecular and Cellular Biology 1 (Nara Women's University)

  • Special Course in Molecular and Cellular Biology 8 (Nara Women's University)

  • Science Open Lab I(D) (Nara Women's University)

  • Special Lecture of Biological Sciences 17 (Nara Women's University)

  • Reading in Biological Sciences I (Nara Women's University)

  • Biological Experiments I (Nara Women's University)

  • Special Lecture of Biology III(D) (Nara Women's University)

  • English in Biological Sciences II (Nara Women's University)

  • Basic Biology 1? (Nara Women's University)

  • English in Biological Sciences III (Nara Women's University)

  • Advanced Course in Laboratory Experiments (Nara Women's University)

  • Environment (Nara Women's University)

  • Special Lecture of Biology V (Nara Women's University)

  • Basic Course of Scientific English (Nara Women's University)

  • Laboratory Course of Plant Physiology (Nara Women's University)

  • Special Lecture of Cell Regulation II (Nara Women's University)

  • Plant Morphology (Nara Women's University)

  • Laboratory Course of Plant Morphology and Systematics (Nara Women's University)

  • Laboratory Course of Basic Biology II (Nara Women's University)

  • Laboratory Course of Basic Biology I (Nara Women's University)

  • Seninar of Cell Regulation IV (Nara Women's University)

  • Methods in Biological Sciences (Nara Women's University)

  • Special Lecture of Biology XIII (Nara Women's University)

  • Seminar of Plant Morphogenesis (Nara Women's University)

  • Plant Morphogenesis (Nara Women's University)

  • Seminar in Regulation of Plant Morphogenesis (Nara Women's University)

  • Regulation of Plant Morphogenesis (Nara Women's University)

  • Special Research of Biological Sciences IV (Nara Women's University)

  • Special Research of Biological Sciences II (Nara Women's University)

  • Graduate Research II (Nara Women's University)

  • Laboratory Course of Cell Physiology (Nara Women's University)

  • Laboratory Course of Morphology (Nara Women's University)

  • Laboratory Course of Molecular and Cellular Biology (Nara Women's University)

  • Morphology (Nara Women's University)

  • Biological Science 2 (Nara Women's University)

  • Special Lecture of Cell Regulation II (Nara Women's University)

  • Special Research of Biological Sciences III (Nara Women's University)

  • Special Research of Biological Sciences I (Nara Women's University)

  • Graduate Research I (Nara Women's University)

  • Laboratory Course of Plant Systematics (Nara Women's University)

  • Plant Systematics (Nara Women's University)

  • Seninar of Cell Regulation II (Nara Women's University)

  • Cell Physiology (Nara Women's University)

Association Memberships

  • American Sciety of Plant Biologists

  • Botanical Sciety of America

  • The Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists

  • The Japanese Society of Plant Morphology

  • The Japanese Society of Plant Morphology

  • The Japanese Society of Plant Morphology

  • The Japanese Society of Plant Morphology

  • The Japanese Society of Plant Morphology

  • The Japanese Society of Plant Morphology

  • The Japanese Society of Plant Morphology

  • The Japanese Society of Plant Morphology

  • The Japanese Society of Plant Morphology

  • The Botanical Society of Japan

  • The Botanical Society of Japan



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